The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (MOBI)

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Ebook Info

  • Published: 2012
  • Number of pages: 108 pages
  • Format: MOBI
  • File Size: 0.41 MB
  • Authors: John Green

Description

The beloved, #1 global bestseller by John Green, author of The Anthropocene Reviewed and Turtles All the Way Down“John Green is one of the best writers alive.” –E. Lockhart, #1 bestselling author of We Were Liars“The greatest romance story of this decade.″ –Entertainment Weekly#1 New York Times Bestseller • #1 Wall Street Journal Bestseller • #1 USA Today Bestseller • #1 International BestsellerDespite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.From John Green, #1 bestselling author of The Anthropocene Reviewed and Turtles All the Way Down, The Fault in Our Stars is insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw. It brilliantly explores the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

User’s Reviews

Reviews from Amazon users which were colected at the time this book was published on the website:

⭐I am not quite finished with the book, but so far, I think it is very well written. It covers a topic that is difficult to talk about and is often avoided. It has been challenging for me to get through; however, I feel like I should add my perspective. I was diagnosed with cancer at 10. I am now 15 years old and a teen-age cancer survivor. I am a volunteer and advocate for pediatric cancer awareness.This book has gotten negative reviews based on several points:1) This is from another reviewer: “The characters are not believable. They do not speak like teenagers. They do not even handle situations like teenagers do. So many interactions between Gus and Hazel are interactions which, plain and simple, just would not happen between real, emotional, scared, awkward, virgin teenagers, let alone ones with cancer who have been socially cut off for much of their lives.”*My point-of-view: Have you spent time with any of us? They are believable as teen-age cancer patients/survivors. We may look like teen-agers, but in our heads, we are not. We have had to face our own mortality and make choices we should never have to make. It makes us grow up…quickly. Most of us do not act or speak like teen-agers because that is no longer how we think. After treatment, many of us find the things most teens (and sometimes adults) are worried about are trivial. Society cuts us off, but we are not cut off from each other. These types of interactions do happen. And, it is emotional and scary, but we learn to tell it like it is, without the normal fluff and awkwardness. We find ‘normal’ where we can and try to live every single day we have because we know that time is an illusion.2) The parents are not real, not deep characters, and they do not have their own identities.*My point-of-view: I have seen my own parents (and siblings) and the parents of other friends struggle with this. Many times, they do not have their own identities anymore. Every single minute is spent trying to make it to the next! They try to keep the family together and functioning, in spite of the effects of treatment, fevers and midnight trips to the emergency room, 3 weeks of the month spent in isolation, jobs in jeopardy, birthdays and holidays interrupted, not to mention talks that parents never want to have with their child. I’ve talked to my mom about this. This becomes their identity. My mom said their jobs become about doing whatever it takes, travelling all over the country (which is very common), researching new studies, and new medicines, all to help us survive and thrive with grace and dignity. It is also their job to prepare, if treatments don’t work, to help us die with just as much grace and dignity.I hope everyone can read this with an open mind and an open heart. Then, reach out to the patients and survivors in your communities. They are wise beyond their years, funny, brave and inspiring.

⭐The best stories are about memory.The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is quite possibly the best standalone novel I have ever read and is certainly the most phenomenal book I’ve had the privilege to experience in the year 2013. It is my third favorite story and favorite non-fantasy novel. The title comes from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, and it sets the perfect tone for this story written in the first person by Hazel, a sixteen year old girl in the regressive stage of lung cancer who nevertheless is required to cart around an oxygen tank because (as she so perfectly puts it) her “lungs suck at being lungs.” Her mother forces her to go to a cancer patient/survivor group where she proceeds to exercise her considerable teenage snark and wit along with her friend Isaac who is suffering from a type of cancer that eventually requires the removal of an eye.One day Hazel catches the attention of a boy named Augustus and their romance is as breathtaking and expedient as it is completely genuine and uncontrived. Augustus has recovered from bone cancer that left him with a prosthetic leg, but did nothing to diminish his spirit. She can scarcely believe he’s as perfect as he projects and indeed feels as though she’s found his hamartia or fatal flaw when he puts a cigarette in his mouth. Hazel is of course livid that anyone who survived cancer would willingly place themselves into its way again, but Augustus never lights them using the act as a metaphor of having “the killing thing right between your teeth, but you not giving it the power to do its killing.”Both of them together have enough wit and snark to drown the world in metaphors and sarcasm with just the barest dash of bitterness for their plight. Hazel whom Augustus calls “Hazel Grace” for most of the novel feels incredibly guilty that she’s allowed Augustus to fall for her as she and her family expect her cancer to return full force at any moment, and yet their relationship parallels the ever moving train of her mortality. So much so that Hazel shares with him that her favorite book is a story by the reclusive author Peter Van Houten called An Imperial Affliction.“My favorite book, by a wide margin, was An Imperial Affliction, but I didn’t like to tell people about it. Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book. And then there are books like An Imperial Affliction, which you can’t tell people about, books so special and rare and yours that advertising that affections feels like a betrayal.”Van Houten’s work is very meta to the larger story at hand being about a girl named Anna who suffers from cancer and her one-eyed mother who grows tulips. But Hazel makes it very clear that this is not a cancer book in the same way that The Fault in Our Stars is not a cancer book. Anna grows progressively sicker and her mother falls in love with a Dutch Tulip Man who has a great deal of money and exotic ideas about how to treat Anna’s cancer, but just when the DTM and Anna’s mom are about to possibly get married and Anna is about to start a new treatment, the book ends right in the middle of a-Exactly.This drives Hazel and eventually Augustus up the wall to not know what happened to everyone from Anna’s hamster Sisyphus to Anna herself. Hazel assumes that Anna became too sick to continue writing (the assumption being that her story was first person just as Hazel’s is), but for Van Houten to not have finished it seems like the ultimate literary betrayal.As terrified as Hazel was to share this joy with Augustus (and god knows I understand that feeling) it was the best thing she could’ve done because they now share the obsession and the insistence that the characters deserve an ending.The conversations of Hazel and Augustus are not typical teenage conversations, but they’re not typical teenagers. Mortality flavors all of their discussions and leads to elegance such as“The tales of our exploits will survive as long as the human voice itself. And even after that, when the robots recall the human absurdities of sacrifice and compassion, they will remember us.”They speak of memory and calculate how there are fourteen dead people for everyone alive and realize that remembering fourteen people isn’t that difficult. We could all do that if we tried that way no one has to be forgotten. But will we then fight over who we are allowed to remember? Or will the fourteen just be added to those we can never forget? They read each other the poetry of T.S Eliot, the haunting lines of Prufrock,“We have lingered in the chambers of the seaBy sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brownTil human voices wake us, and we drown.”And as Augustus reads Hazel her favorite book she“…fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.”The quotes from this story are among the most poignant and beautiful I have ever seen.“Grief does not change you, Hazel. It reveals you.”“There will come a time when all of us are dead. All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything. There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught. Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever. There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it. God knows that’s what everyone else does.”When I finished this I thought to myself, “How am I going to read anything else? How will I find something to match this? How can I pick up another book and not expect it to resonate with this haunting beauty, this tragedy ringed with comic teenage snark and tones that are themselves tragic in their sarcasm like whistling in the ninth circle of hell or laughing uproariously at the monster?” I realized I was lost. I could think of no negative critique unless you count the fact that the two main characters have Dawson’s Creek Syndrome where they’re teenagers who speak as if they were philosophers, but then again Bill Watterson did the same thing with a boy and a stuffed tiger.You realize the story’s hamartia doesn’t matter. That the fact that the plot may be cliched is unimportant and that dwelling on such trivialities is in and of itself a fatal flaw. This story is so much more than the letters and words on each page. It’s the triumph of morning over night when the night grows ever longer. It’s the dream of hope when you’ve done nothing but dine on despair. It is sad? Yes. It is heartbreaking? More so. Is it worth reading? Has anything sad and heartbreaking not been worth reading? The story of Hazel and Augusts deserves to be read just as the story of Anna, her mother, and dear hamster Sisyphus deserves an ending, and that becomes their exploit to seek out reclusive Peter Van Houten so that the characters can be properly laid to rest and remembered.The best stories are about memory.

⭐My thoughts at 25%:I’m so confused. Why is this book hilarious, with all its witty banter and thoughtful philosophy? Shouldn’t I be crying over the depth of the subject matter? Shouldn’t I be feeling broken by the abject loss of the power of death – the way it’s so all-consuming and doesn’t care who it touches or who it hurts? How is it that I keep smiling this delighted smile and laughing gleefully over the way these characters find joy in spite of their suffering? Maybe it’s the irony of Hazel’s cynicism, I don’t know.My thoughts at 50%:Okay. The end of Chapter 10? I can’t stop crying. Augustus is funny and smart and intellectually stimulating. He’s quick and clever and patient and gentle. But he’s also a little bit of a smartass and he’s impossibly fun. It’s brutally endearong, especially combined with Hazel’s matter of fact personality, her acceptance of life as what it is and not what she wishes it was. My emotions are so raw right now … I need a break from the story … And yet I cannot force myself to take one.My thoughts at 75%:I wear glasses because chronic dry eye syndrome gives me progressively horrifying eye fatigue, which blurs everything more and more the longer the day goes on. But right now I’m reading with my glasses off, and everything is a blur, because I can’t wear glasses while crying.My thoughts at 100%:I finished this book somewhat disappointed. I didn’t cry my way through the end, as I had expected to. But I read that last word, closed it out, and promptly burst into tears. For its appreciation of both life AND death, for its humor AND its realistic portrayal of devastation, for its twists AND its inevitable turns … For its lessons and its inspiration … Five stars.

⭐Received it just today.I need not to write about the content as all already know how good this book and John Green are.Coming to the physical condition…It looks pretty good. I’ve been reading lots of negative comments about the page quality but believe me its totally fine and nothing to be bi*ched about.

⭐First time in a while, I couldn’t put the book down. As soon as I received it, I started reading betraying my sleep.. Which was just worth it. “Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.” “Okay.” Guys in books are just so perfect that when something happens to them, u can feel your whole world crashing down in front of your eyes or may be imagination but you just can’t help it. Writing a review about such an amazing book feels like I am ditching them by trying to put the feels in words. I quote “I kinda had some non fictional feels for fictional characters, I can still feel it.” Go for this one, I promise you won’t ever regret. “Okay.”

⭐I’ve just finished the sob-fest that is ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ by John Green. It was recommended to me by my teenage daughter. I started to read it, out of a sense of obligation, to show an interest in her taste in books, and to have something for us to chat about. Knock my socks off, it’s fantastic! Brilliant characterisation from the start. It’s terribly sad. I suggest you don’t read it if you are unwell or depressed, but it raises some very deep philosophical issues about life, death, the universe and everything. It gives me a bit of hope that our young adults might not be scrambling their brains with screens all the time, but engaging with a beautifully written story with some challenging themes. Five stars.

⭐I held off on reading this book for a long time, as I knew the read would undoubtedly be interspersed with floods of tears, followed by a day of swollen eyes and headaches. I suspected the book would be worth the price and how right I was. Without a doubt, this is most intricately crafted piece of literature I have read since picking up Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, well over 10 years ago. A part of me wants to be the English Lit student I was then, so I could sit and tease this book apart to fully appreciate the minutes that went into making every facet mesh together so elegantly. I found every one of the characters to be believable and likeable and there was something very real about the entire story line. For a book this painful to be worth reading, it needs to be also humorous and exquisitely beautiful. Aim achieved, John Green.

⭐Undoubtedly, the best book I have ever read! John Green writes with a point of view of a 16 year old Hazel Grace Lancaster. He teaches us love in a very different manner. Augustus Waters, the person who is strongly beloved by everyone. He was beautiful. I know boys aren’t supposed to be, but he was, he really was.( SORRY HAZEL FOR STEALING YOUR LINE, THOUGH) . Their love was not the one that boasted or anything, but the love that they were proud of! Thank you John Green!!~Aahana Chandel

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